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Just read this letter from a reader in my local paper. I've no idea if his figures are correct or not but he does make a point.

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Sir, – One thing is completely missing from the announcement that a ban on new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars will be brought forward to 2035 at the latest – any indication of where the electricity is going to come from to power all the replacement electric vehicles.

If all our vehicles were to be electric we would need to more than double UK electricity generation.

Current annual UK electricity production is around 335 TWh (TeraWatt hours).

The energy in all the petrol and diesel we use annually is around 475 TWh.

If it were partial, and only the domestic and light commercial vehicles went electric, that would still require about 375 TWh each year.

If in addition we replace all our domestic gas usage with electricity we will need around another 510 TWh.

In other words, we will need to more than triple our electricity generation.

At the same time we have spent years demolishing fossil fuel power stations, which provide round-the-clock baseload electricity, and replacing them with wind turbines which can only provide expensive part-time electricity.


Nor are we building lots of nuclear power stations, which provide a low carbon alternative source of caseload power.

The unavoidable conclusions are that a carbon-neutral economy is a cynical and dangerous fantasy.
 

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I was reading an article the other day about environmental issues with Lithium extraction for the batteries.
Apparently the bulk is extracted from salt lakes in the Andes and needs a large amount of water to make it happen.
The locals are suffering from severe water shortages.
Apparently it's estimated that there's going to be a tipping point in the next ten years when Hydrogen fuel cells are going to be taking over.
The infrastructure is very slow in the UK but Germany is building fuel stations at quite a rate.
Once in place the cost of cars will come down, new cheaper models will appear and the need for extra electricity generation will subside.
At the moment here it's still in a "chicken and egg" situation.
 

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BIK Matey, down from £10500 to £3200 whats not to like about that then-instant pay rise and a good quality motor.
 

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Here is the joke of electric cars, but seriously, its all down to range worry, and transfer of pollution to the generators instead of the car....




 

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Nor are we building lots of nuclear power stations, which provide a low carbon alternative source of caseload power.
And quite right to that we should not be building these, because of Fukushima Japan that had melt down of their power stations resulting in radioactive contamination of japan and the West Coast of the USA, and we can go back further when we in Europe all got contaminated by Chernobyl powerstation. Have we not learned the lesson.

Nuclear power stations are not cheap, I remember them telling us that there would be so much cheap power we would get it for next to nothing. Nuclear power stations are like a bomb installed in your community waiting to go off. They leak contamination into the sea and into the air. coverups are rampant to hide or downplay accidental incidents. also the finale is decommissioning costs and time. Take Dunray in the north of Scotland, Decommissioning of Dounreay was initially planned to bring the site to an interim care and surveillance state by 2036, and as a brownfield site by 2336, at a total cost of £2.9 billion (under estimated). Yes...2336 to make it safe to walk on the ground, as if it had never been there. crazy!.

Further to this we are now getting a new Hinkley Point C nuclear power station (HPC) is a project to construct a 3,200 MWe nuclear power station with two EPR reactors in Somerset, England. ... Financing of the project is still to be finalised, but the construction costs will be paid for by the mainly state-owned EDF of France and state-owned CGN of China. Now considering Chinas contribution to this project, and how much software and computers are involved, who knows what hidden subroutines could be in there. All it would take is a hidden command to get melt down, and their goes the half the UK with contamination. You would say no that is not possible, but do you know all the software routines and programs in your car, never mind something as complex as a Nuclear powerstation. Call me paranoid, but better safe than sorry and not have Nuclear powerstations at all. I would rather see more green power instead.

Conclusion: In this day and age, with all the disasters of Nuclear power, we should not have these in the country at all, as they pose the biggest danger to us all.
 

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Plus probably 90% of cars will be charge overnight that’s a lot of demand
And any service who pays for all the lost work days when the grid goes down
 

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Infrastructure has to come first for electric cars. Demand will fuel the supply of electric charging points. It will last for about ten years then hydrogen cell motors will take over and the whole thing will revolve again.
 

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I agree with Colin4X4 I dont think that France has built a Nuclear power station that has worked properly, & I think that allowing China to install the software that will be running Hinkley is a VERY BAD IDEA.:unsure::mad:o_O:eek::eek::eek:☢☢☢☢☢
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Predictable 🤣🤣
 

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Whether we go Electric or Hydrogen, we are likely to have to use Nuclear Power to sustain the population levels we have... Nuclear power stations can generate Hydrogen as well as Electricity, in fact its Hydrogen that gets generated that caused the explosions in Fukushima once the cooling system were damaged and possibly the main secondary explosions in Chernobyl , Of course a huge amount has been learnt from the disasters of both these stations that were built in the previous century.

And whether these are in the UK or abroad, it'll make little odds if there is another catastrophe, as much of the radiation that reached the atmosphere from Chernobyl fell over the Scottish Highlands and Welsh mountains (along with Sweden, Norway and the Alps).

Its all about safety management, which is where a lot always tends to fall down, due to cost and complacency.
 

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electric cars .... the green mob will find something to moan at with that just as the infrastructure is complete in 20 years time at a cost of billions ... new power stations built too supply the demand... and then we will of possibly just conquered the art of electric cars and some bright spark will invent a panoramic roof that act as a solar panel and a pole that ejects up and a sail pops out .... or hydrologic pedals ...
In the meantime I’m going to keep filling up with diesel, swerve around all the potholes in the road that have been dug up and not fixed properly by the utility companies, drive my Evoque that after years of production and planning and new models that have problems through trying to make things environmentally friendly, and not working .... yes let’s all rush out and by electric .... not me
 

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"Metals and minerals used in rechargeable batteries include copper, graphite, cobalt, lithium and nickel. Lithium is also used in smartphone batteries, putting more pressure on demand.

This warning has been echoed by mining industry experts. Yuen Low, metals and mining analyst at Shore Capital, says there is the “potential for a shortage” in some of the metals used in EV batteries.

A lithium shortage was possible, although companies were searching for the metal.
He adds: “There’s probably a bigger structural shortage of nickel. The consensus is that there will be a shortage of supply in a few years’ time.”

 
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